Updating knotty pine kitchen cabinets

"To maximize storage, we stacked the cabinets to the ceiling, and specified deep drawers and tall pantries," say the designers.

But Ashley's vision and hard work came together beautifully in an updated and lovely space: Let’s start with a little introduction…I’m Ashley – furniture painter, blogger, small business owner, decorator, wife, dog lover and wine drinker.Cabinet projects can be grand or small, salvaged, abandoned mid-project and then started over.No matter the scale of the upgrade, altered cabinetry affects the look of your entire kitchen.Scroll through these real-life renos to see how homeowners tackled their problematic cabinets and landed their dream kitchens.A recent surge of animosity on some other blogs aimed at knotty pine kitchens has been upsetting my karmic balance.We had no clue whatsoever about what the inside of the home looked like but of course, when we saw it in our minds, we pictured it with the original kitchen and baths and other period details still intact.When we finally did get the word that the house would be for sale, we anxiously awaited the day that we could see inside.I was quickly learning that I loved the challenges of bringing an old home back to life and and finding ways to create your own mark on a space.This passion evolved into me creating a furniture restoration company and a blog to write about not only my furniture makeovers, but also our home renovation projects.There are many different colors of wood fill, but since you’re painting your cabinets, matching the tone isn’t really a big deal (although it can’t hurt to grab the one that most closely resembles the color of your current cabinets). The sanding process isn’t always necessary (for example, our cabinets weren’t glossy so we skipped it and went straight to priming) but for some people with super shiny cabinets (aka: lots of polyurethane) it can’t hurt to run an electric sander over everything- or take a bit more time to hand sand things- with fine grit paper to rough everything up for maximum paint stickage. If they feel matte like a cutting board (a little absorbent) then they shouldn’t need it, but if they feel shiny like a laminated piece of paper or a glossy credit card then sanding is your best bet. Due to all the grease and even just the wood stain that often coats kitchen cabinets, it’s über important to get down and dirty with oil-based primer (even if the water-based equivalent claims that it works just as well on cabinet surfaces, we’ve seen stains seep right through that stuff, so oil-based is the better-safe-than-sorry alternative).Note: lead paint is a serious health risk when sanding, so if you have an older home with already-painted cabinets that look decades old it’s worth testing for lead with a lead test kit from Home Depot. One coat of primer applied with a decent quality roller should do the trick (then just use a brush to get into those tigher spaces and the grooves in the doors).