Dating service scammers

Upon finding victims, scammers lure them to more private means of communication, (such as providing an e-mail address) to allow for fraud to occur.

The fraud typically involves the scammer acting as if they've quickly fallen for the victim so that when they have the opportunity to ask for money, the victim at that time has become too emotionally involved, and will have deep feelings of guilt if they decline the request for money from the scammer.

These scammers tend to prey on victims that may be especially lonely, shy or isolated and therefore more vulnerable.

There are a number of variations on the same basic scam.

There are a great many quite legitimate dating service websites that allow members to establish online relationships.

Often, these online friendships blossom into genuine long-term relationships.

They create fake profiles to build online relationships, and eventually convince people to send money in the name of love.A romance scam is a confidence trick involving feigned romantic intentions towards a victim, gaining their affection, and then using that goodwill to commit fraud.Fraudulent acts may involve access to the victims' money, bank accounts, credit cards, passports, e-mail accounts, or national identification numbers or by getting the victims to commit financial fraud on their behalf.Don’t send money to tide someone over after a mugging or robbery, and don’t do anyone a favor by making an online purchase or forwarding a package to another country.One request leads to another, and delays and disappointments will follow.Victims can be highly traumatized by this and are often very embarrassed and ashamed when they learn they have become a victim of a scam and that the romance was a farce.In some cases, online dating services are themselves engaged in misrepresentation, displaying profiles which have been fabricated, which use personal information from users who have not agreed to be depicted on the site social accounts, classified sites and even forums to groom new victims.Fraudsters may also use the conversations you have to find out enough personal information about you to commit identity fraud.They’ll ask innocent-looking questions about you that make it look like they just want to get to know you, such as your date of birth, home address or family background.The majority of accounts on dating websites are genuine people looking for romance, but fraudsters may try to contact you by making fake profiles, getting in touch and building what feels like a loving relationship.Once a fraudster using a fake dating profile is confident that they’ve won your trust, they will tell you about a problem they’re experiencing and ask you to help out by sending money.