Absolute dating lesson plan

Based on this information, they will learn how to relatively date associated artifacts.They will interpret their archaeological site by writing an explanation of when each stratum and artifact was deposited in their site.This hands-on activity is a simulation of some of the radiometric dating techniques used by scientists to determine the age of a mineral or fossil.The activity uses the basic principle of radioactive half-life, and is a good follow-up lesson after the students have learned about half-life properties.The age of fossils can be found using relative dating or radiometric dating, which is also called absolute dating.Radiometric dating involves using radioactive elements and their half-lives to figure out the age of the fossils.Then in Phase 2 of the project, the teacher will provide the students with plastic bins each representing a different stratum of the archaeological site.Using the absolute dating principles provided in Phase 1 of the lesson, students will make decisions of which artifacts to send to a lab for absolute dating.

Concept 3, PO 1: Interpret data that show a variety of possible relationships Concept 4, PO 2: Produce graphs that communicate data Concept 4, PO 3: Communicate results clearly and logically Concept 4, PO 4: Support conclusions with logical scientific arguments Strand 6: Earth and Space Science Concept 3, PO 4: Interpret a geologic time scale.Matter is made of minute particles called atoms, and atoms are composed of even smaller components.These components have measurable properties, such as mass and electrical charge.Concept 3, PO 5: Distinguish between relative and absolute geologic dating techniques.This activity has students working as archaeologists.For instance, if you choose Carbon-14 as your isotope, you will need 2 different colors (like red will be Carbon-14 and blue is Nitrogen-14).If you choose to make all bags Carbon-14 bags, then you will need enough red and blue beads for all four bags. So we have to rely on something called radiometric dating to figure out the age of rock.Because these rates do not change and because the radiation that rocks give off can be measured, it became possible to calculate the time the rock was formed or, in other words, the rock's birth date - give or take a few thousand years or so.Radiometric dating is sometimes referred to as radioactive dating.In fact, you might like this term better, because the dating method relies on the known decay rate of radioactive isotopes.